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Our practice is excited to welcome Dr. James Foster, who will be joining us as of September 1st!

September 2021

Tuesday, 21 September 2021 00:00

Why Do My Ankles Hurt After Running?

Runners take hundreds of steps per minute while they run. During each step, a large amount of force is transmitted through the foot, ankle, and leg. The ankle takes most of the force, so it should come as no surprise that runners often experience ankle pain. There are several factors that contribute to ankle pain while running. Muscle imbalances and weakness or tightness in some part of the foot, ankle, or calf, can change the way force is distributed while you run, putting more pressure on the ankles and leading to injuries. Repetitive overuse from intense bursts of running and not giving yourself enough time to fully recover can also cause or worsen ankle pain. Previous injuries, such as an ankle sprain that hasn’t completely healed or hasn’t healed properly, can increase the risk of future ankle injuries as well. It is important to wear properly fitted, supportive shoes while you run. If you are a runner suffering from ankle pain, it is suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist. 

All runners should take extra precaution when trying to avoid injury. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists of Central Ohio Comprehensive Foot Care. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

How to Prevent Running Injuries

There are a lot of mistakes a runner can make prior to a workout that can induce injury. A lot of athletes tend to overstretch before running, instead of saving those workouts for a post-run routine. Deep lunges and hand-to-toe hamstring pulls should be performed after a workout instead of during a warmup. Another common mistake is jumping into an intense routine before your body is physically prepared for it. You should try to ease your way into long-distance running instead of forcing yourself to rush into it.

More Tips for Preventing Injury

  • Incorporate Strength Training into Workouts - This will help improve the body’s overall athleticism
  • Improve and Maintain Your Flexibility – Stretching everyday will help improve overall performance
  • “Warm Up” Before Running and “Cool Down” Afterward – A warm up of 5-10 minutes helps get rid of lactic acid in the muscles and prevents delayed muscle soreness
  • Cross-Training is Crucial
  • Wear Proper Running Shoes
  • Have a Formal Gait Analysis – Poor biomechanics can easily cause injury

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Delaware and Westerville, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about How to Prevent Running Injuries

Overuse and repetitive motion is the cause of Sever’s disease. It is a condition that affects the heel of the foot in young children and teenagers, and typically occurs in active people of this age group. It happens as a result of the muscles, tendons, and ligaments pulling on the growth plate in the heel when overuse occurs. Common symptoms that are associated with this condition can consist of heel pain, and it is often worse upon arising in the morning. Effective treatments often begin with temporarily stopping the activity that caused the condition, followed by elevating the affected foot. If you notice your child is limping, please schedule a consultation with a podiatrist who can properly treat Sever’s disease.

Sever's disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is experiencing foot or ankle pain, see one of our podiatrists from Central Ohio Comprehensive Foot Care. Our doctors can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain associated with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Delaware and Westerville, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

Read more about Sever's Disease
Monday, 13 September 2021 00:00

Are You Suffering From Ingrown Toenails?

If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to more serious concerns, such as an infection. Knowing proper nail care can help in the prevention of an ingrown toenail. Give us a call, and get treated!

The peripheral nervous system transmits signals between the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) and organs and limbs. For example, peripheral nerves would send a signal to the central nervous system regarding pain in the foot and the brain would direct the body to respond accordingly—that is, when this messaging system works correctly. In peripheral neuropathy there is damage to the peripheral nerves, which impedes this messaging system. Peripheral neuropathy is commonly caused by diabetes, but may also be present due to heredity, side effects of chemotherapy, drug or alcohol abuse, and other illnesses. Peripheral neuropathy can trigger symptoms in the feet such as numbness or an inability to perceive pain or temperature, cramping, muscle weakness, or tingling. Diabetic neuropathy can be particularly problematic as even minor cuts or abrasions can go undetected and turn into wounds or ulcers. If you are experiencing any of the symptoms listed, contact a podiatrist for a full examination and evaluation to determine if you may have peripheral neuropathy.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with one of our podiatrists from Central Ohio Comprehensive Foot Care. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Delaware and Westerville, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease
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